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with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
of fire. i can see a couple of people, some law enforcement, some police with rifles walking the perimeter. again, you've got to imagine about 20, 25 police cars and other vehicles surrounding one particular -- surrounding something. and we think it's a car. and i'm being told by an intel source that it may possibly be somebody known to the younger bomber. erin? >> all right, deb, thank you. and what deb just said there is very important. they're trying to figure out -- at this point, we thought it was just the two brothers. the family members, the friends that we have spoken to, knew nothing about this. the uncle, as we have heard, knew nothing about this. but now, what they're saying, is that they may have had an associate. that may be the need for the interpreter. this was the crucial question all the way through which is how many people may be involved? >> you're definitely going down the right road. that's what we're understanding and we're hearing. but it also could be, i'm being told, they've met someone who may be helpful and the man is not very con ser sant in english. that's why
thousands of law enforcement military personnel searching for this 19-year-old? >> well, they're working very hard obviously to find him. the question is whether or not he is still in the area. you have to do two three things. follow up on any leads they get based on tips, they're going to identify some locations where he might go to seek shelter -- family, friends, neighbors, that sort of thing -- then they'll look at the area they saw him last. that is the area of the shootout. they'll process the scene to see whether there is any blood evidence there that might actually be connected to somebody other than his brother. that would help them determine whether he is injured. >> his 26-year-old brother is now dead. we're told in the shootout with law enforcement he was discovered having explosive, an explosive vest almost like a suicide bomb vest. that's why there is so much concern that perhaps the younger brother, the 19-year-old who is still on the loose right now may also be wearing some sort of explosive device. that could be extremely dangerous. >> sure. that is the reason why they'r
only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to gather intelligence to prevent a future attack, rather than having to negotiate through his lawyer to get any information. jenna: but, if i could, senator, there seems to be a lot of discrepancy about some of the information come being out about this investigation. >> right. jenna: we've all seen it, you know, played out on the news and otherwise. i would like to drill down a little bit into an even change you just had about the boston terror attacks with the s*epbg o secretary of home land security january elt napolitano. we showed an older brother, this tkhaou owe, that is secretary napolitano. we just sh
about the zoning laws in texas? >> stephanie: lack of government regulation! they had like a zillion times more -- than you're allowed to have and how many feet from a school! >> a school and a nursing home! that shouldn't happen! >> stephanie: i can't remember the number. i'll get to it. hello! that's rand paul's libertarian pair dice. fertilizer plant with however many tons you want. >> near an active fault zone. >> stephanie: hmm? anyway so obviously lots of breaking news left and right. you were saying the latest i guess is that the -- dzhokhar. i feel like i'm in the cone head sketch. dzhokhar. he is responding to written questions. he's not talking yet. >> he has a wound in their neck. they're not sure if it was self-inflicted. a tube down his neck but he can write. so he is answering questions. >> stephanie: so no word about what we're finding out or not so far. but anyway, so far from dzhokhar. sorry. i'm a little punchy from last week. >> that was a help of a news newsweek. >> like the onion said, cheese us this week. >> stephanie: really? what else now. speaking of what els
of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
of prosperity and of nations living by rule of law and of nation's living in peace. countries where strong human rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the wo
involvement. >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. >> and in dagestan, the suspect's mother is adamant that her sons are innocent. >> what happened is a terrible thing, but i know that my kids have nothing to do with this. i know it. i am mother. >> joining us now from boston is nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff. and frank silufo, director of the homeland security policy institute at george washington university. good afternoon, to both of you. mike, as the investigations continue both here and oversea, we understand that investigators are confident these brothers acted alone. even as their family members express utter bafflement. what are we learning about the larger case against these suspects? >> reporter: well first of all, this is looking, martin, more and more like a case of self-radicalization. now, nothing is conclusive and, you know, we're far from the end of this investigation right now. >> of course. of course. >> reporter: but the preliminary indicators, first, you have tsarnaev saying the
. in the boat. >> unsuccessfully in the throat. he's communicating with law enforcement by writing. by -- i don't know how he's doing it. >> rose: or nodding in some way? >> he's communicate with them. not ideal circumstance, but that's what he's doing. >> rose: do we know whether it's a cooperative way or not? >> it seems to be cooperative. but, again, i don't have any inside information. we don't know as much as we know. and the older brother really got radicalized in a hurry. >> rose: by a trip back to -- >> no, not -- by the time he made his trip back he was already deeply involved in this. >> rose: so why did he go back? >> well, according to the parents, according to the parents he had to go back in order to renew his passpo and he went back for six months. right now we are at the stage where we don't know his exact whereabouts except for that the parents say that the older brother, tamerlan, stayed with them in dagestan, in the capital city and the father claims-- although the father and mother seem wounded and deluded to say the least about their sons' activities-- say that he was with
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)